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Corporate Health Promotion Initiative Timing

As they say: “timing is everything.” Use the guidelines below to guide the timing of Corporate Health Promotion Initiative activities and data collection. http://forskolin-coleus.com/

Timing: Corporate Health Promotion Initiative Start-up
• Consider the optimal time to start a new Corporate Health Promotion Program. Take into account preferences of the target population and other factors that could affect enrollment and participation.
• By way of example, coordinating the start of an adult weight management initiative with the start of school in August or September may be a good tie-in with a “fresh start.”
• On the other hand, starting an adult weight management initiative In January may not be a great idea because of the constraints that weather may put on exercising outdoors.
• Make use of other timing cycles at your company. Planning a marketing blitz just after the PCS turnover has been completed is a good way to let new personnel know what Corporate Health Promotion Initiative options are available. http://coleusforsholi.com/

Timing: Corporate Health Promotion Initiative Participant Support
• Consider how frequently Corporate Health Promotion Initiative sessions should be offered to provide the best support and education for members and the best opportunity for success.
• Get feedback from members regarding what session frequencies work best for them.
• Consider the timing for other support mechanisms like email encouragement. What timing of those messages will benefit members most: Weekly? Bi-monthly? Monthly? http://pokrzywandyjska.pl/

Timing: Corporate Health Promotion Initiative Data Collection
• Collecting data is an excellent way to track member progress and also to establish potential problems within a Corporate Health Promotion Program. So, give some thought to the frequency and timing of data collection.
• Select metrics that can realistically change during the Corporate Health Promotion Initiative implementation time period. By way of example, BMI and weight may not change very much during a 10-week Corporate Health Promotion Program; however, step counts are more likely to noticeably change.
• Some data, such as member responsiveness to out-of-class assignments (like food journals) and other interim data (like step counts) will provide important information needed to “adjust fire” as needed and make Corporate Health Promotion Initiative changes if something is not working.
• Be flexible regarding data collection frequency. Instead of requiring that members complete an exercise log every day, for example, consider asking for a “snapshot” summary from two or three days during the week. You will still get information to review, but members will have an easier time complying with the assignment. http://forskolina.com.pl/

Timing: Corporate Health Promotion Initiative Follow-up
• Because the we are such a mobile population, it’s best to plan some sort of post-Corporate Wellness Program follow-up data collection within two to four months after the Corporate Health Promotion Initiative ends.
• You can always try to collect additional follow-up data at 6 or 12 months after Corporate Health Promotion Initiative completion. However, if you collect the data sooner, you’ll at least have collected some short term Corporate Health Promotion Initiative impact information before members are lost to follow-up.

May 11, 2009 No Comments

Effective Corporate Health Promotion Initiative communication

Corporate Health Promotion Initiative communication is important to all phases of Wellness and preventive medicine and is relevant to:
• Healthcare provider-patient relationships
• An individual’s exposure to, search for, and use of Corporate Health Promotion Initiative information
• Effective counseling and patient education for behavior change
• Content of public health messages and community campaigns

Effective health communication should have these attributes:
• Accuracy: content is valid and error-free
• Availability: delivered or placed where the intended audience can access the information
• Balance: content presents benefits and risks of potential actions
• Consistency: content is locally consistent over time and is also consistent with information from other reliable sources
• Evidence-based: content and methods of delivery are based on relevant scientific proof
• Reach: content gets to or is available to as many individuals as possible in the target population
• Reliability: content source is credible; content is kept up-to-date
• Repetition: delivery of/access to the content is continued over time, to reinforce the impact with the audience and to reach new members of the target population
• Timeliness: content is provided when the audience is most receptive to, or in need of, the specific information
• Understandability: reading, language levels, and format are appropriate for the specific audience (i.e., Employees, Family Members, Garrison leadership, etc.)

What the research says about health communication
• Health communication best supports Wellness when multiple communication methods are used to reach specific audiences.
• Effective Wellness and communication initiatives should reflect an audiencecentered perspective, and reflect the preferred formats, contexts, and way of communication for the intended audience.

Material adapted from: United States Department of Health and Human Services. Healthy People 2010. 2nd ed. With Understanding and Improving Health and Objectives for Improving Health. 2 vols. Washington, DC: United States Government Printing Office, November 2000.
http://www.healthypeople.gov/document/HTML/Volume1/11HealthCom.htm

May 11, 2009 No Comments

Effective Corporate Health Promotion Initiative Strategies – Part 2

Evaluation of successful Corporate Health Promotion Initiatives has revealed several primary Corporate Health Promotion Initiative strategies to increase Corporate Health Promotion Initiative effectiveness and impact overall Soldier health.

Strategy #5: Using a small number of targeted priorities maintains Corporate Health Promotion Initiative focus.
• Needs assessment data can be used to establish leading health and wellness needs and also high risk populations.
• Choosing a handful of specific health and wellness needs on which to focus will maximize efficient use of resources.
• Keeping the Corporate Health Promotion Initiative focus small will avoid duplication of other ongoing company Corporate Health Promotion Programs.

Strategy #6: Use standardized processes whenever possible.

Reduce the amount of variation within your Corporate Health Promotion Initiatives by standardizing all the processes needed for Corporate Health Promotion Initiative planning and begination. By way of example:
• Use the same spreadsheet format for data collection so that the columns are in the same order. This way you can compare data more easily.
• Reuse the same forms for enrollment and attendance. Change the heading as needed.
• Look at other Corporate Health Promotion Initiative processes (like registration, evaluation, marketing, etc.). What parts of those processes can be standardized?
• The Wellness and Prevention Initiatives website (http://chppmwww. apgea.army.mil/dhpw/Population/HPPiFunction.aspx) has many standardized Corporate Health Promotion Initiative resources in a variety of topic areas.

Strategy #7: Corporate Health Promotion Initiative delivery methods should be flexible and adapted to population needs.
• Delivery of products and services may depend on: company needs, training requirements, other scheduling considerations (such as work/duty schedules, school scheduling, etc.), member preference, and/or availability of staff or space.
• Be flexible: the same produce/service delivery methods may not work for every population.
• Some company’s may want services provided to them as close as possible to the company location; other companies may prefer as many services as possible bundled together at once (regardless of location).
• Take wellness and preventive medicine beyond the walls of the employer in order to meet leadership and worker needs. Answer the question: “How can we best help leadership and Employees to fulfill their mission?”

May 11, 2009 No Comments

Effective Corporate Health Promotion Initiative Strategies – Part 1

Evaluation of successful Corporate Health Promotion Initiatives has revealed several primary Corporate Health Promotion Initiative strategies to increase Corporate Health Promotion Initiative effectiveness and impact overall Soldier health.

Strategy #1: Communication with leadership is critical
• Assess leadership priorities.
• Report Corporate Health Promotion Initiative outcomes back to leadership in a timely manner.

Strategy #2: Corporate Health Promotion Initiative planning must be driven by data.
• Determine specific needs of the target population.
• Focus on the health status of the population as a whole to establish the top health concerns.
• Information should drive decisions regarding which health and wellness needs should be addressed first.

Strategy #3: Use electronic data collection and reporting as often as possible.
• Centrally collected data in an electronic format is essential for determining population health and wellness needs.
• Electronic reporting is also very valuable when communicating Corporate Health Promotion Initiative outcomes to leadership and other stakeholders.
• Flexible reporting capabilities allow data to be presented as information that can support decision-making, in formats that decision-makers prefer.

Strategy #4: Multidisciplinary collaboration enhances worker health and maximizes available resources.
• Collaboration between health disciplines increases effectiveness of Wellness and preventive medicine initiatives.
• Don’t forget to look outside the employer for collaboration partners.
• Optimized Corporate Health Promotion Initiative outcomes can be met by coordinating the activities of medical consultants, cadre, community agents, and funding sources.
• Bundling services together also provides the additional benefit to units by conserving training and mission time.
Implementing these strategies can improve Corporate Health Promotion Initiative effectiveness and optimize available resources.

May 11, 2009 No Comments

Tools for Achieving behavior Change

Changing health-related behaviors is a difficult challenge. Incorporate the tools below into your Wellness initiatives to assist members in successfully changing health behaviors.

Tool #1: Set effective goals
• Focus on areas that can impact the overall goal.
• By way of example, if the overall goal is to lose weight, the most productive areas to focus on are the activity and dietary changes that will lead to long-term weight loss.
• By way of example, stress management and improving self-esteem may also impact weight loss; however, improving relationships, while a worthwhile topic, will not necessarily impact weight loss.
• Make the goals specific, attainable, and forgiving. By way of example:
• “Exercise more” is too general.
• “Walk five miles everyday” is specific, but may not be attainable.
• “Walk 30 minutes everyday” is specific and more attainable, but is not very flexible.
• “Walk 30 minutes, five days a week” is specific, attainable, and forgiving.
• Use a series of short-term goals to achieve the ultimate goal.
• Short-term goals break big challenges into more easily attained pieces.
• Smaller steps also provide Corporate Health Promotion Initiative members with encouragement and success. These small successes are critical for maintaining motivation towards a long-term goal.

Tool #2: Increase self-awareness
• Self-monitoring is useful for tracking behavioral and environmental cues that trigger a particular behavior.
• Keeping track of behavior status is also useful for times when progress towards a goal is difficult to measure, or when an individual is in a maintenance stage.

Tool #3: Offer rewards and motivation
• Encourage members to reward themselves for achieving small successes on the way to their ultimate goal.
• Remember that rewards don’t always have to be “things.” Words of encouragement and praise can provide powerful motivation when spoken by a teacher, instructor, parent, friend, etc.

Tool #4: Respond effectively to set-backs
• behavior change is conceptually a continuum. However, movement along that continuum is not just in one direction. Employees can move backwards or forwards or sometimes just stay put. Communicate to members that set-backs, lapses and even staying the same (i.e., maintenance) are common for individuals trying to change behavior.
• Stress is often a factor in lapses and relapses. Offer a variety of stress management resources to help members better handle the stress which could trigger a set-back.
• Brain storm to create a list of potential (and probable) barriers to member behavior change. Then formulate strategies to meet each of those challenges.
• Enhanced time management and decision-making skills can be effective ways to overcome behavior change relapses.
• Offer members with information regarding the behavior change process so that they will be better prepared for the challenges they will face. A brief overview of the Stages of Change may be helpful.

May 11, 2009 No Comments

Setting Corporate Health Promotion Initiative Priorities

The majority of corporations do not have the Corporate Health Promotion Initiative resources to address all of their health and wellness needs at once. Priorities must be set to determine the most pressing health and wellness needs. Use the steps below to prioritize company Wellness needs.

Assess the health and wellness needs of the population.

Collect data about the health and wellness needs in the community. How?

• Community- or target group-specific surveys

Establish health and wellness needs and at-risk populations.

Use the data to establish leading health and wellness needs and also high risk populations. By way of example:
• Obesity and overweight
• Injury prevention
• Self care

Reduce the list.

Not every health need can (or should) be addressed. Use the following questions to determine which health and wellness needs should be addressed first.
• How does the health need impact operational readiness? How big is the impact?
• What are the Senior Management priorities? How does the health need fit into those priorities?
• What are the behavioral factors affecting the health need? What is the proof that a behavior change will make a difference? Has the behavior been successfully changed by other Corporate Health Promotion Programs?
• What other physical, social, or environmental factors influence the health need or the target population?
• Is the health need a greater problem at the local level than in the United States population as a whole?
• Does the employer have the subject matter expertise and resources to address the health need?

Develop Corporate Health Promotion Initiative recommendations.

Only a handful of specific health and wellness needs should be focused on in a given year. Keep the following in mind as recommendations are developed as to which specific health and wellness needs will be addressed:
• Avoid duplication of other ongoing Corporate Health Promotion Initiatives whenever possible. Establish Corporate Health Promotion Initiatives already addressing the health need and/or the target population.
• Establish and assess available resources. Build on existing services whenever possible.

Use the recommendations to offer tailored, targeted, integrated initiatives to address the prioritized list of health and wellness needs. Prioritizing health and wellness needs will keep Corporate Health Promotion Initiatives focused, maximize efficient use of resources, and align Wellness efforts with Senior Management goals and priorities.

References
• US Department of Health and Human Services, Planned Approach to Community Health, http://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/publications/PATCH/index.htm.
• Implementing a Comprehensive Community Wellness and Well Being Program, presentation by CHPPM-EUR at the 2006 Force Health Protection Conference

May 11, 2009 No Comments

Bottom Line Up Front Corporate Health Promotion Initiatives

Keeping the bottom line up front Bottom Line Up Front in Corporate Health Promotion Initiative will help you get and sustain Senior Management support. A Bottom Line Up Front approach will also help you more realistically measure the impact of your Corporate Health Promotion Program.

The bottom line in Corporate Health Promotion Initiatives answer two primary questions:
• How will member health be improved?
• What’s in it for Senior Management?

The ultimate bottom line: all roads should lead to readiness.

• Always be ready to communicate to leadership the ways that your Corporate Health Promotion Initiative impacts readiness.
• Think like Senior Management: what Corporate Health Promotion Initiative outcomes will be important from a Senior Management point of view?
• Develop line-centered language that communicates those outcomes.
• Ask members how they think a particular Corporate Health Promotion Initiative enhances force readiness. This input is a valuable source of information.

Use the following steps as a Bottom Line Up Front approach to Corporate Health Promotion Programs.

Step 1: Think about the end of the Corporate Health Promotion Initiative first and plan backwards.
• It has been said, “If you don’t know where you’re going, any road will get you there.”
• Before planning or implementing any part of the Corporate Health Promotion Program, be able to answer the questions: how will member health be improved? What’s in it for Senior Management?

Step 2: Establish concrete Corporate Health Promotion Initiative outcomes.
• Establish up front what the Corporate Health Promotion Initiative is working towards.
o By way of example: will members lose weight? Walk more steps? Decrease injuries? Move to another stage of change?
• Establish any processes or procedures that will be improved.
o By way of example: which pharmacy operations will become more efficient? How will record-keeping be streamlined?

Step 3: Determine what will be measured to show that Corporate Health Promotion Initiative goals were achieved.
• Consider what data is really needed to show Corporate Health Promotion Initiative effectiveness. Avoid the temptation to collect every possible piece of data. Choose a handful of important data points and stick to those.
• Think backwards when determining what data to collect – consider how easily follow-up data can be collected when a Corporate Health Promotion Initiative ends. Getting follow-up data is often a challenge.
• Only collect data for health behaviors or indicators that the Corporate Health Promotion Initiative actually affected.
o By way of example: if the main Corporate Health Promotion Initiative goal is that members will walk more steps, then it may be better NOT to choose changes in cholesterol level as a Corporate Health Promotion Initiative outcome (unless the Corporate Health Promotion Initiative specifically addresses cholesterol).
• Avoid measuring outcomes that the Corporate Health Promotion Initiative cannot (or did not) affect.

Step 4: Determine what Corporate Health Promotion Initiative elements must be included to move members towards the Corporate Health Promotion Initiative goals.
• The concrete Corporate Health Promotion Initiative outcomes identified in Step 2 are the compass for keeping the Corporate Health Promotion Initiative on track. All Corporate Health Promotion Initiative elements should lead towards that ultimate goal.

Working backwards when planning and implementing Corporate Health Promotion Initiatives is really forward thinking. Keeping the bottom line up front is a smart approach to Corporate Health Promotion Programs.

May 11, 2009 No Comments